By Sunil Kumar Varma Google

True beauty…

July 8, 2014 Leave a comment
Categories: arriere-pensee, Poetry

An end of an Innings… Sachin Tendulkar

November 11, 2013 Leave a comment

sachin attitude

Sachin Tendulkar has been the greatest sports icon for India and he inspired Indians from all walks of life. I am just one among the millions who love, admire and awed by the talent of Sachin Tendulkar on the cricketing field. For long time he was the only sports superstar that we had to boast about. Saying this I am not trying to ignore the accolades of our other sporting stars like Vishwanathan Anand, Vijay Amritraj, Prakash Padukone, Milka singh, PT Usha and others. While they were great none of them achieved anything close to what Sachin has achieved in their respective sports. They were always the brides maid never the bride. We can argue at length that cricket has much more budgets, funds and support than any other sport in India, but the fact remains that  we are a cricket crazy nation and that is the only sport where we compete at the highest level. Other than cricket I can not really think of any sport where we would be called a top class team. So why crib?

 While there are few skeptics out there who believe that there are other who were better than him;  that he only plays for records or he should have retired couple of years back, I choose to ignore them as people who speak without out facts in hand.For those who play the tune that Sachin was never a match winner and played for his centuries, pls check this analysis of his win ratio for those games he hit a century, the links are given below.

(“Another Sachin century, another match India couldn’t win…” is there merit in that statistic.) 

Centuries going down the drain….Sachin and his 12 non productive centuries

Those who are convinced that he plays for the records, I just want to add “he plays and the records follow him”. What i really like about Sachin Tendulkar is his humility. The fact that he has been humble all his live even after what he has acheived is in itself a great achievement as a human being.In the two decades we have not come come across any controversy, loose gossip or incidents that have always been associated with super stars.He is always calm, composed and always speaks with  dignity that befitted someone who is not only a great sportstar but a good human too. He is someone who can be a sporting idol for current generation and generations to come.

 As his innings comes to a close and and he walks back in to the pavilion one last time, I tSachin-Tendulkar byehought is is just right to compile all that he has achieved on the green circle. Given below are 200 facts about Sachin that you may like to know.

(Compiled from internet)

1. His father named him after the legendary music director Sachin Dev Burman.

2. During his school days, he grew his hair and tied a band around it to copy his idol, tennis legend John McEnroe.

3. While growing up, Sachin would ask his friend Ramesh Pardhe to dip a rubber ball in water and hurl it at him to see the wet marks left on the bat to know whether he had middled the ball!

4. Praveen Amre bought him his first pair of international quality cricket shoes

5. When Sachin was fourteen, Sunil Gavaskar gave him a pair of his own ultra-light pads. However they were stolen when Sachin was at an Under-15 national camp in Indore.

6. Dilip Vengsarkar gifted Sachin a Gunn & Moore bat after he was picked for the Bombay Under-15 team.

7. Sachin has 13 coins from his coach Ramakant Achrekar. He would win a coin if he could get through an entire session of nets without being dismissed.

sachin-bowls-pti8. Raj Singh Dungarpur was instrumental in amending the rules of the iconic Cricket Club of India to allow the fourteen-year old Sachin to use its dressing room despite his age

9. Sachin wanted to be a fast bowler but was rejected by Australian great Dennis Lillee at the MRF Pace Academy at Chennai in 1987.

10. In August 1987, Sachin was ignored for Bombay Cricket Association’s Best Junior Cricketer of the Year award, Sunil Gavaskar then wrote an encouraging letter to the fourteen-year-old with the postscript: ‘Don’t be disappointed at not getting the Best Junior cricketer award from BCA. If you look at the best award winners, you will find one name missing and that person has not done badly in Test cricket!’

11. He was a ball boy during the 1987 World Cup semi-final between India and England at Wankhede.

12. He fielded for Pakistan as a substitute during a one-day practice match against India at Mumbai’s Brabourne Stadium in 1988.

13. Playing for his school Sharadashram against St. Xavier’s at the Azad Maidan in February, 1988, he was associated in the then world record unbroken stand of 664 runs with Vinod Kambli for the third-wicket. Both players remained unbeaten on 326 and 349 respectively.

14. He sang and whistled with Vinod Kambli during their 664-run record stand in the Harris Shield tournament in 1988 to avoid eye contact with the coach’s assistant who wanted to declare while the duo wanted to bat on.

15. Two wards in Delhi’s Tihar Jail were named after Sachin and Vinod Kambli, after the duo shared a 664-run unbroken partnership in a school tournament.

images16. Gursharan Singh played with one hand (despite a broken finger) to help Sachin get a superb century in the Irani Cup game of 1989-90.

17. Tendulkar holds the unique distinction of scoring a century on debut in Ranji Trophy, Irani Trophy and Duleep Trophy.

18. Sachin scored a duck on his One Day International debut against Pakistan at Gujranwala on December 18, 1989

19. Sachin was returning from India’s tour of England in 1990 when he met his future wife, Anjali, for the first time at the Mumbai airport. He was 17 then!

20. Sachin’s father-in-law, Anand Mehta, is a seven-time national champion in Bridge.

21. Sachin’s first man of the match in a Test was at Manchester in 1990 and he got Magnum champagne bottle as the prize. Sachin preserved it for eight years and finally uncorked it on his daughter Sara’s first birthday.

22. Sachin had to wait for 79 matches for his first ODI century on September 9, 1994. By that time he had scored seven Test hundreds.

23. He was without a bat contract during the 1996 World Cup in which he emerged as the highest run-getter.

24. Aftesachin_time300r his Perth hundred in 1992, The famous London Times correspondent John Woodcock, in his ’70s, was moved enough to say: “Gentlemen, he is The best batsman I have seen in my life. And unlike most of you, I have seen Bradman.”

25. In 1992, he became the first overseas player to represent Yorkshire county team.

26. Aged 19, it made him the youngest Indian to play in county cricket

27. On November 14, 1992, playing against South Africa at Kingsmead in Durban, Tendulkar became the first batsman to have been declared run out by a third umpire.

28. In 1997 Sachin was one of the five cricketers selected as Wisden Cricketer of the Year.

29. In 1998 Sachin was chosen for the 1997-98 Rajiv Gandhi Khel Ratna Award.

30. When then BCCI president Raj Singh Dungarpur was asked why was Tendulkar not seen at the presentation after Pakistan won the Chennai Test of 1999 despite a brilliant hundred from Tendulkar, a distraught Raj Singh said: “He is crying in the dressing room.”

31. Tendulkar refused to do a Pepsi ad because it required him to smash cricket balls with a fly swatter. He told ad-film maker Prahlad Kakkar that this will project him as bigger than the game of cricket. The ad was modified and stumps replaced the fly swatter.

32. In 1999 Sachin was conferred “Padma Shri” – India’s fourth highest civilian honour.

33. During the 2007 Lord’s Test, one of the most popular British actors Daniel Radcliffe  queued up for an autograph of Sachin at the end of the game.

    34. In 2008 Sachin was conferred Padma Vibhushan – India’s second highest civilian honour.

35. Launched in 2009 by a company founded by former investment banker Karl Fowler, a book on Sachin Tendulkar – Tendulkar Opus -has 852 pages edged in gold leaf with each page measuring 50cm x 50cm and weighs 37 kg.

36. In 2010, Sachin was conferred an honorary rank of the Indian Air Force which made him the first sportsperson to be conferred a rank by the IAF and the first personality with no aviation background to receive the honoChildhood Photour.

37. In the team bus, Tendulkar always takes the left window seat of the front row

38. In the dressing room, he chooses his spot first -Sachin always occupies a corner. Once he has exercised his choice, others rush to take their places.

39. Sachin follows Roger Federer and Formula 1 and understands music and medicine. Is fond of seafood and can hold a conversation on the merits of different wines.

40. The team has a system of monetary fines for players coming late (to the bus or a meeting or a function) and for flouting the dress code. But Tendulkar has never had to pay up in 23 years.

41. Sachin bats right-handed, bowls with his right-arm, but writes with his left hand

42. In 2002 cricket bible Wisden rated him as the second greatest Test batsman, behind Sir Don Bradman

43. In 2003 Wisden rated Sachin the greatest ever ODI player

44. In 2010 he won the ICC Award-Sir Garfield Sobers trophy for cricketer of the year

45. He is the only cricketer to receive Rajiv Khel Ratna, India’s highest sporting honour

46. Sachin features in Bradman’s all time Test XI, the only player from the current generation

47. Sachin is the only Indian to find a place in Wisden’s all-time World XI.

48. The Don, rated by many as the greatest batsman of all time, considered Tendulkar to have a batting style similar to his. “Bradman was most taken by Tendulkar’s technique, compactness and shot production, and had asked his wife to have a look at Tendulkar, having felt that Tendulkar played like him. Bradman’s wife, Jessie, agreed that they did appear similar,” his biography records

49. Tendulkar has been on Twitter since May 2010, tweeting as @sachin_rt

50. In less than a year Sachin hit the one million follower mark to become the only Indian in the million-follower club.

51. He is the only Indian cricketer to have a waxwork at Madame Tussaud’s

52. He is one of the first sportsmen, along with Grandmsachin_eng centuryaster Vishwanathan Anand to receive Padma Vibhusan in 2008, which is Indian’s second highest civilian honour

53. Sachin scored a hundred (100*) for Mumbai against Gujarat at Mumbai in 1988-89 season on his first class debut, to then become the youngest to do so on debut in Indian first class cricket and the second youngest to score a hundred at the age of 15 years & 232 days.

54. He remains the only player to score century on debut in Ranji Trophy, Irani Trophy and Duleep Trophy. His scoring sequence were: 100 not out for Mumbai against Gujarat at Mumbai in 1988-89 in Ranji Trophy, 103 not out for Rest of India against Delhi at Delhi in 1989-90 in Irani Trophy and 159 for West Zone against East Zone at Guwahati in 1990-91 in Duleep Trophy.

55. On his Test debut, Sachin Tendulkar was the third youngest debutant (16 years 205 days). Mushtaq Mohammad (15 years 124 days) and Aaqib Javed (16 years 189 days) debuted in Test matches at a younger age than Tendulkar.

56. When Tendulkar scored his maiden Test century in 1990, he was the second youngest to score a century. Only Mushtaq Mohammad had scored a century at a younger age by 1990. Tendulkar’s record was bettered by Mohammad Ashraful in 2001-02 season. The record for previous youngest Indian centurion was held by Kapil Dev.

57. Sachin has played the most number of Test Matches (198) in Test cricket.

58. Sachin is the highest run scoring player in Test history with 15,837 runs.

59. Sachin has the distinction of scoring the most runs at any position in Test cricket. In 273 innings, he has amassed 13408 runs at his favourite batting position (# 4) with the help of 44 centuries and 57 fifties.

60. Highest number of Test centuries (51), overtaking Sunil Gavaskar’s record (34) in December 2005 vs Sri Lanka in Delhi.

61. Sachin has scored centuries against all Test playing nations. He was the third batman to achieve the distinction after Steve Waugh and Gary Kirsten.

62. Only batsman to have scored at least TWO centuries against ALL other Test playing countries.

63. The first ball Sachin faced in international cricket was bowled by Waqar Younis. Mohammad Azharuddin was his partner.

64. Sachin’s record of five test centuries before he turned 20 is a world record, still held by him

65. Is the only player to score Test centuries more than twenty years apart. Don Bradman’s first and last three-figure scores came 19 years 7 months apart.

66. His seven centuSachin-Tendulkar-007ries in 2010 are the most by an Indian batsman in a calendar year.

67. 1562 runs scored by Sachin in Test cricket in 2010 are also the most by an Indian batsman in a calendar year.

68. 12 of Sachin’s Test hundreds have come after the age of 35. England’s Graham Gooch remains the only other player to have done so.

69. 15 of Sachin’s Test centuries came under Mohammad Azharuddin.

70. Tendulkar has the distinction of scoring most fifty-plus innings (51 centuries and 67 fifties = 118) which remains the world record for any batsman.

71. Holds the record of aggregating most runs in AWAY Tests (8705).

72. Is the first batsman to have aggregated 1,000 runs against SEVEN different countries in Test cricket. The only teams missing are Zimbabwe (918 runs) and Bangladesh (820 runs).

73. Holds the record of most runs in between two dismissals with 497 runs in 2003-04 season (spread across three Tests and five innings with the sequence of 241*, 60*,194* and 2).

74. First Indian to score 300 runs in a Test without getting dismissed.

75. Has crossed 150 on 20 occasions in Test cricket – most such instances for any batsman in Test cricket.

76. Has completed his hundred with a six on SIX occasions in Test cricket – a world record.

77. When he scored his 51st hundred, which was against South Africa at Cape Town, he became the first overseas batsman to have scored 5 centuries on South African soil. The previous highest was 4 Test centuries by Wally Hammond of England and Neil Harvey of Australia.

78. Sachin holds the record of aggregating most runs by an overseas batsman in two countries- Sri Lanka and Bangladesh.

79. Became the first player to surpass the 12,000, 13,000, 14,000 & 15,000 Test run marks.

80. Tendulkar is the fastest to reach the following thousand-run marks in terms of innings: 10000 CRICKET-ENG-INDruns (195 innings- joint record holder with Brian Lara and Kumar Sangakkara), 12000 runs (247 innings – joint record holder with Ricky Ponting),13000 runs (266 innings),14000 runs (279 innings) and 15000 (300 innings).

81. Holds the unique record of having appeared in most WON (70) and most LOST (56) Tests for India.

82. Sachin has been dismissed stumped only once in Test matches. The only occasion was against England at Bangalore in 2002. Just 10 runs away from his century,Sachin got irritated by Ashley Giles’ negative bowling (bowling well outside the leg stump) and wicketkeeper James Foster effected a smart stumping.

83. In 2001-02 Sachin was dismissed LBW in five consecutive innings – an Indian record

84. Sachin has been involved in 23 run-outs. He was out on 9 occasions and his partner on 14 occasions.

85. Steve Smith dismissed Sachin Tendulkar with the first and (so far) only ball he has bowled to him in Tests.

86. If Sachin’s final Test goes to the fifth day, Sachin would have a career span of 24 years 3 days- fifth longest for any player in Test annals and longest ever for a sub-continent player.

87. Sachin played his first 32 Tests on different grounds.

88. Sachin’s 14 man of the match awards are the most by an Indian in Test cricket.

89. Sachin’s 5 man of the series awards are the most by an Indian in Test cricket (along with Virender Sehwag).

90. Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid put on 20 hundred-plus stands in Test cricket. This is a world record for the most number of century partnerships by a single pair in Test cricket.

91. Despite being dubbed as a unsuccessful captain, averaged 51.35 in 25 matches in which he captained India. His average is the highest for an Indian captain with at least 500 runs to his credit.

92. Sachin has played Test cricket with 593 players (108 teammates and 485 opponents) – most for any player in Test cricket

93. Sachin played 47 of his Tests under the captaincy of Mohammad Azharuddin – more than any other captain

94. Sachin has played 146 Tests with Rahul Dravid, 122 with Anil Kumble, 120 with VVS Laxman and 103 with Sourav Ganguly4854452_f520

95. Sachin hit 2 sixes off his first two balls in India’s fourth innings successful chase against Australia at Chennai in 2013.

96. Eleven bowlers have dismissed Sachin as their first wicket in Tests. They are: Hansie Cronje (South Africa), Ujesh Ranchod (Zimbabwe), Ruwan Kalpage (Sri Lanka), Mark Ealham (England), Neil Johnson (Zimbabwe), Jacob Oram (New Zealand), Monty Panesar (England), Cameron White (Australia), Peter Siddle (Australia), Peter George (Australia) and Andy McKay (New Zealand).

97. Sachin has never batted at number three in his entire Test career. He has opened once, batted 273 times at number 4, 29 times at number 5, 20 times at number 6 and 4 times at number 7.

98. Sachin has top-scored on 53 occasions in a completed innings- more than any other Test player.

99. Between November 1989 and June 2001 Sachin played 84 consecutive Tests without a break.

100. Sachin has played on 59 different Test grounds – more than anyone else

101. By an odd coincidence Sachin has aggregated same number of runs (5068) in match’s first innings as well as second innings.  Incidentally Sachin holds the record of aggregating most runs in first and second innings of a Test. He has also scored most runs (1625) in match’s fourth innings. His tally of 2996 runs is the third highest in third innings of a Test.

102. Sachin has batted for 41113 minutes (685 hours 13 minutes) in Test cricket. Only Rahul Dravid has batted longer.Sachin_at_the_other_end

103. Six times Sachin has hit winning runs in a Test – most by an Indian. Only Ricky Ponting (9) and Desmond Haynes (7) have done this more often in Test cricket.

104. On his ODI debut, Sachin Tendulkar was the second youngest debutant at 16 years 238 days. Only Aaqib Javed had made his ODI debut at a younger age (16 years 127 days) than Sachin Tendulkar.

105. Sachin scored ducks in his first two ODIs, he ended his ODI career with innings of 114 and 52.

106. His 463 matches are the most by any player in ODI history.

107. Between April 1990 and April 1998 Tendulkar played 185 consecutive matches – a World record.

108. Sachin played ODIs on 96 different grounds – most by any player.

109. First to play 400 innings in ODI matches.

110. Most runs: 18426 runs at an average of 44.83

111. He is the leading run scorer in the ODI format of the game and the only player ever to cross the 14,000, 15,000, 16,000, 17,000 and 18,000 run marks.

112.  First player to reach 10,000-11,000-12,000-13,000-14,000-15,000-16,000-17,000 and 18,000 ODI runs.

113. 15,310 of his runs have come while opening the innings with the aid of 45 centuries and 75 fifties in 340 innings- most by an opener.

114. Was the first batsman to score a double century in ODIs (200* against South Africa at Gwalior on Feb 24,2010).

115. Is the only player to have made three scores of 175 or more.

116. Is the only player with five scores of 150 or more.

117. Holds the record for scoring 1,000 ODI runs in a calendar year on most occasions. He has done it seven times – 1994, 1996, 1997, 1998, 2000, 2003 and 2007

118. Scored over 1,000 ODI runs against all major teams.

119. Is the first batsman to score over 3,000 runs against an opponent (3,077 runs against Australia).Since then he has also done this against Sri Lanka (3,113 runs).

357_tendulkar120. His 49 centuries are easily the most by any batsman in ODIs. Ricky Ponting is distant second with 30.

121. His nine centuries against Australia are the most by any player against a particular country. He occupies the second place too, with eight centuries against Sri Lanka.

122. Is the only Indian to score a century on ODI captaincy debut (110 v Sri Lanka at Colombo RPS on 28-08-1996).

123. Most Fifties: 96

124. Highest number of 50+ scores in ODI’s – 145 (49 Centuries and 96 Fifties).

125. First player to have scored over 100 innings of 50+ runs.

126. Most Man of the Match awards: 62

127. Most Man of the Series awards: 15

128. Most ODI runs in a calendar year: 1894 ODI runs in 1998.

129. Most Centuries in a calendar year: 9 ODI centuries in 1998

130. Sachin Tendulkar with Sourav Ganguly holds the world record for the maximum number of runs scored by the opening partnership. They put together 6609 runs in 136 matches that include 21 century partnerships and 23 fifty run partnerships. The 21 century partnerships for the opening pair is also a world record.

131. Sachin Tendulkar and Rahul Dravid hold the world record for the highest partnership in ODIs when they scored 331 runs for the second wicket against New Zealand in 1999-00 at the Hyderabad.

132. Sachin was the first Indian player to score a century and capture four wickets in the same ODI (v Australia at Dhaka on October 28, 1998).

133. Had the longest career span (22 years 91 days) for any player in ODIs.

134. Sachin playphotoed ODIs with 866 players (123 teammates and 743 opponents) – most for any player in ODI history.

135. Sachin was dismissed on 99 on three occasions in ODIs – most such occasions for any batsman. Interestingly all these instances came in 2007.

136. In his first two ODIs Sachin was unable to even open his account. He got out off the second ball in both the matches.

137. Sachin’s first six in ODIs was against England at Leeds in 1990 (off Eddie Hemmings) in his sixth match.

138. The 3113 runs scored by Sachin against Sri Lanka are the most by any player against a particular country in ODIs

139. In 1998 Sachin scored 12 international hundreds – most by any batsman in a calendar year.

140. Sachin’s first six in Tests was against South Africa at Cape Town in 1993 (off Omar Henry) in his 32nd innings.141. In Tests, December has been Sachin’s most productive month. The little master aggregated 2866 runs in 36 Tests averaging 47.76.

142.  In Tests, Sachin has scored most centuries in the month of January- 10. His average of 72.91 is also his best for any month.

143. In ODIs, March was Sachin’s most productive month. He aggregated 2818 runs in 61 matches at an average of 51.23 in this month. Sachin also scored most centuries (8) in March.

144. Sachin has crossed 150 or more in ODIs on five occasions– most by any player.

145. In ODIs, July was Sachin’s best month average-wise. In 25 matches Sachin’s average was 52.33 while aggregating 942 runs. March (51.23) and June (51.20) were the other  months in which Sachin averaged 50 or more.

146. Sachin was the first batsman to score a double century in ODIs (200* against South Africa at Gwalior on Feb 24, 2010).

147. Sachin remains the only Indian to score a century on ODI captaincy debut (110 v Sri Lanka at Colombo RPS on Aug 28,1996).

148. In his ODI career Sachin Tendulkar played with 123 different team mates. 20 of them had made their ODI debut before Tendulkar, while 101 made their debut after Tendulkar. Two players- Salil Ankola and Vivek Razdan- made their ODI debut along with Tendulkar.

149. Sachin played 245 ODIs with Anil Kumble and Rahul Dravid, 238 with Sourav Ganguly, 223 with Mohammad Azharuddin and 204 with Jsachintendulkar_wideweb__470x312,0avagal Srinath.

150. Venkatapathy Raju played all his 53 ODIs alongwith Sachin!

151.Only six Indian bowlers have taken more four-wicket hauls than Sachin’s six in ODIs.

152. Nearly 25% of all centuries made by ALL Indian batsmen in ODIs had come from Sachin’s bat when he retired from this format in 2012.

153. Is the only batsman to aggregate 1,000 or more runs in a calendar year in ODIs on seven occasions (in successive years from 1996 to1998, in 1994, in 2000 and in 2003).

154. Holds the distinction of scoring most runs and hundreds in a calendar year in ODIs. Tendulkar aggregated 1894 runs in 34 matches with nine hundreds in 1998.

155. Only the second player (after Javed  Miandad) to appear in SIX World Cups – from 1992 to 2011.

156. Most runs (2278) in World Cup history including 6 centuries & 15 fifties with a best score of 152 against Namibia in 2003 world cup.

157. 673 runs in 2003 Cricket World Cup, highest by any player in a single World Cup.

158. Player of the Tournament in ICC Cricket World Cup 2003

159. His 6 centuries are the most hit by any batsman in the World Cup.

160. His 21 fifty-plus scores (6 hundreds & 15 fifties) are the most by any batsman in World Cup.

161. Is the only batsman to aggregate 400 runs in a World Cup on THREE occasions – in 1996, 2003 and 2011

162. Only player to aggregate 500 runs in two editions of the World Cup (673 in 2003 and 523 in 1996).

163. Has won 9 Man of the Match awards in the World Cup – most by any player.

164. Only player to score four consecutive 50s on TWO occasions (in 1996 & 2003).

165. Holds the record of scoring the fastest fifty by an Indian in the World Cup (off 26 balls v Bermuda in 2007).

166. Holds the record of hitting most fours in a single edition of World Cup– 75 in 2003

167. Holds the record of hitting most fours in all World Cup matches (221)

168. Holds the record of involvement in maximum century-partnerships (12) in World Cup

169. Has most manimages2 of the match awards (8) in World Cup

170. Sachin ended a one-dayer on winning note with a six on two occasions – against Sri Lanka at Sharjah in 1995 (off Champaka Ramanayeke) and against England at Kanpur in 2002 (off Jeremy Snape) .

171. The most runs Sachin has scored in one over in ODIs is 24 off New Zealand’s Chris Drum at Hyderabad in 1999-00. Sachin hit one six, four boundaries and a couple. The four extras made it a 28-run over for team India. During the World Cup game against Sri Lanka at Delhi, Sachin scored 23 runs off one over from Ravindra Pushpakumara.

172. Sachin’s 134 against Australia at Sharjah in 1998 still remains the highest ODI score by any player on his birthday.

173. In 1998 Sachin won 12 man of the match awards in ODIs – most by any player in a single calendar year.

174. Sachin’s fastest knock in ODIs is 57* off 29 balls (SR 196.55) against Bermuda at Port-of-Spain in 2007.

175. Sachin was involved in a record 99 century partnerships in ODIs with 21 different partners– most for any player.

176. Sachin also holds the record for scoring most boundaries in ODIs

177. He is the only player to have taken 150 wickets and scored more than 15,000 runs in ODIs

178. During the Australian tour of India in 1998 Matthew Hayden said: “I have seen God. He bats at no. 4 in India in Tests”

179. 16 bowlers dismissed Sachin as their first ODI wicket!

Sachin Tendulkar (35)180. Sachin Tendulkar is the only cricketer to have achieved the unique double of scoring 15,000+ ODI runs and taking 150+ ODI wickets.

181. In 39 innings in tournament finals Sachin aggregated 1851 runs (at an average of 54.44) – more than any other batsman in ODI history.

182. Sachin’s six centuries in ODI finals are also the maximum for any batsman. No one else has scored more than three.

183. Sachin has hit the most boundaries in international cricket. Second-placed is West Indian Brian Lara, with Ricky Ponting in third.

184. He holds the record for the most Man of the Match and Man of the Series awards in international cricket (all three forms combined). Till date, he has won the MoM award 76 times (14 times in Tests, 62 times in ODIs) and the MoS award 20 times (5 times in Tests, 15 times in ODIs). Both are world records.

185. Between 25th April 1990 and 24th April 1998, Sachin Tendulkar represented India in a total of 239 matches (54 Tests and 185 ODIs) without missing a single game. Till date, this remains a world record for the most number of consecutive matches for a team.

186. Tendulkar’s best bowling in international cricket came in a one-day international against Australia at Kochi on April Fool’s Day in 1998.

187. Tendulkar made his international debut at the age of 16 years. He is still the youngest debutant for India both in ODIs as well as in Tests.

188. Sachin set the record for most runs in an IPL season in 2010, scoring 618 runs in 14 innings with the Mumbai Indians.

189. Sachin has aggregated 2000 runs in international cricket in a calendar year on four occasions– More than anyone else.

190. Only batsman in cricket annals to score over 100 centuries in international cricket.

191. First batsman in history to score over 50 centuries in international cricket.

192. In all international cricket Sachin has aggregated 34273 runs – easily the most by any batsman. Ricky Ponting is distant second with 27483.

193. Holds the record of getting out the maximum number of times on 90s in international matches. He has been dismissed 27 times (17 in ODIs and 10 in Tests) on scores of 90-99. On one occasion in ODIs he remained unbeaten on 96. The 18 nineties in ODIs is an ODI record too.

194. Holds the record of aggregating most runs against a particular opponent in all forms of International Cricket (Tests, ODIs and Twenty20s). Sachin has aggregated 6707 runs against Australia in all international cricket with 20 centuries and 31 fifties at an average of 49.68

195. Sachin’s 20 centuries against Australia are the maximum by any batsman in all forms of international cricket against a particular country, surpassing Don Bradman who had made 19 Test centuries against England.

196. Has also hit most number of sixes (264) in international cricket for India

197. The 50108 runs scosachin and india flagred by Sachin in all recognised cricket (first-class, list A and Twenty20s) are the most by a sub-continent player.

198. The 81 centuries scored by Sachin in first-class cricket are the most by any Indian (with Sunil Gavaskar).

199. Brett Lee has dismissed Sachin in international cricket on 14 occasions– most for any bowler.

200. In his last game across different formats (Tests,ODIs, T20Is, IPL, CLT20, Ranji Trophy) Sachin has ended on the winning side.

Banged up Abroad

November 10, 2013 Leave a comment

Words I would die to use in Conversations…..

October 3, 2013 Leave a comment

WordsThe dictionary is filled with strange and wonderful words that are scandalously underused. Open at any page and you’re likely to find a gem glistening in the corner, whether it’s gongoozle (to stare idly at a watercourse and do nothing) or zwodder (a feeling of drowsiness). We see it, and think to ourselves that we absolutely must use it in conversation. But by the time that you actually see someone staring idly at a watercourse and doing nothing, you can’t quite remember what the word was, and of course you’ll never be able to find it again. It’s lost, hidden away among the much more boring words. Why do dictionaries insist on defining words like “and”. And why do they have to be arranged alphabetically?

We all have moments when we’re lost for words, or when we struggle to describe the-little-plastic-bits-on-the-end-of-your-shoelaces (anglets), but it’s usually too much of a hassle to run off and read through all 18 volumes of “the Oxford English Dictionary” searching for just the right term. There was a guy recently who read the whole thing cover to eighteenth cover, but it took him a whole year, and if you did that every time you were looking for the right word, you might come back to find that the conversation had moved on.

That’s why I decided to pick out all the best and most useful unused words in the dictionary and put them in a book. But I wasn’t going to arrange it alphabetically. I decided to arrange them by the hour of the day when they might be useful. So antejentacular (before breakfast) is in the chapter for 7 AM, and curtain lecture (a telling-off given by a wife to her husband in bed) is saved until midnight. Ultracrepidarian (giving opinions on a subject you know nothing about) is saved for office hours, and gymnologising (having an argument in the nude) isn’t.

In the end, I found myself describing a complete day, but a day based around the finest words in the dictionary. That was my rule: they all had to have been recorded in at least one English dictionary. These words are beautiful. They remind us of why English is the greatest language on earth. They tell us stories about lost worlds. They make us laugh and sometimes shock us. But most importantly, they deserve to be brought back. They’re all still usable. Some of them are nearly new, with just a few citations on the clock. So come on, expand your word power. Here are ten beauties to get you going.

Quomodocunquize
Quomodocunquizing is “making money in any way that you can”. It’s almost the same as the modern word “hustling” except without any of the gangster-ish overtones. It’s listed in the Oxford English Dictionary, but they only have one recorded use of it from 1652 where the Scotsman Thomas Urquhart complained about “Those quomodocunquizing clusterfists and rapacious varlets.”

Whiffler
A whiffler is somebody who walks in front of you through a crowd, waving a chain or an axe in order to clear your path. Back in Medieval times kings and aristocrats would have whifflers to walk through the town square in front of them pushing away any peasants who might have got in the Royal Way. However, I think that whifflers could make a comeback. They could hire themselves out in busy airports and shopping malls and blast your way through.

Mind you, whiffler can also mean “a smoker of tobacco”.

Smicker
Though the words in “The Horologicon” are all old or strange, it’s amazing how easy they are to use, and how people understand you straight away. To smicker is to “look amorously after somebody.” It’s one of those wonderful words whose meaning is obvious the second you use it in the right context. “Stop smickering at that woman! It’s so embarrassing.” Or “Why is Brad ignoring me? I spent hours on this hair-do and not even a smicker.”

It’s a lovely little detail of anatomy that the muscles used to move your eyes sideways are called the amatorial muscles, because they’re the ones that you use to give amorous glances.

Deipnophobia
Deipnophobia is “a morbid fear of dinner parties.” We all have it occasionally, especially when the in-laws are involved. The Oxford English Dictionary lists it alongside deipnodiplomatic, which means “inviting people round to dinner in order to patch up an argument.” They both come from the Ancient Greek deipnon, which just meant dinner. But one of the joys of the hidden corners of the dictionary is all the words that English has constructed from ancient languages. The next entry is for deipnosophist, which is “somebody who talks wisely over dinner.”

Uhtceare
Uhtceare is an Old English word for “waking up before dawn and not being able to get back to sleep because you’re worried about something.” Uht (pronounced oot) was the hour before sunrise and ceare is the same as the modern English care. Sometimes the joy of discovering a strange word is the realisation that other people have experienced that. It’s not just me who lies there waiting for the alarm clock. People have been suffering from uhtceare for over a thousand years.

Sprunt
Sometimes a word tells you about a time and a place that’s gone forever. Sprunt is an old Scottish word meaning “to chase girls around among the haystacks after dark.” It’s recorded in an old dictionary of the dialect of the Roxburgh, but it tells you so much about what Roxburgh must have been like. Imagine a time and a place where chasing girls around among the haystacks after dark was such a common activity that people said “We need a single-syllable word for this.” It beats staycationing any day.

Going to Siege
People can never say what they mean, especially when it comes to the bathroom. The English language is full of strange ways of telling people that you’re off to fulfill the needs of nature. In the eighteenth century people talked of “taking a voyage to the Spice Islands,” in the nineteenth century gentlemen would “ease themselves.” but back in Medieval times a knight would tell people that he was “Going to siege.” There’s something so poetic about it, so military and noble! But it also firmly implies a dose of constipation.

Fudgel
To fudgel is an eighteenth-century term meaning “Pretending to work when you’re not actually doing anything at all.” Modern offices are full of it, largely because when somebody is staring intently at a computer screen and typing it’s hard to tell whether they’re busily putting together this year’s accounts or busily updating their Facebook status or buying something on eBay. “Stop fudgelling” should be the catchphrase of every efficient office manager.

A Wheady Mile
The wheady mile is the last mile or so of a journey that, for some reason, seems to take much longer than it should. It’s an old dialect term from rural Shropshire, but it still applies to modern journeys. It feels as though you’re about to walk through your own front door and collapse into a chair, but instead there’s still the twists and turns and then, even when the wheady mile is complete, you’ve got to find somewhere to park the car. Mind you, a wheady mile is better than a Pisgah sight, which is when, like Moses on Mount Pisgah looking at the Promised Land, you can see something whilst knowing that you’ll never get there.

Groke
To groke is an old Scots term meaning “to look at somebody while they’re eating in the hope that they’ll give you some of their food.” Originally, the term was only applied to dogs, and any dog owner will know that look of plaintive groking that comes whenever you’re eating sausages. But groking can be applied to humans as well. Just try opening a box of chocolates in any modern workplace and watch as your co-workers come by to groke and ask you how you are.

Finifugal
If you’re finifugal you’re afraid of finishing anything and… Oh God… I can’t… I can’t.

NOKIA…FALL OF A GIANT..Microsoft buys Nokia for 7.18 Billion

September 4, 2013 1 comment

Microsoft acquisition of Nokia phone and device business brings to a close a remarkable period of high tech leadership. If you looked across the mobile landscape a decade ago you saw Nokia, Ericsson and DoCoMo of Japan, not Android, Apple and Samsung. Since 2007 Nokia has been hacked mercilessly by a tide of competition that it should have been well able to withstand, after-all it was the grand dad of the market. Even more amusing is the fact that Apple and Google has no prior expertise in the telecom market and Samsung was fiddling around with the extremely competitive consumer electronics landscape trying to find a footing for itself. The big daddies of the market were Nokia, Motorola and Ericsson. None of them exist any more in the handset market. They shut shop or meekly allowed to be taken over.

There was a time when I vouched that there was no phone that was better than Nokia. Even in my wildest dreams I could not have imagined Nokia being bought by Microsoft at a paltry 7.2 billion dollars. In comparison,* Xiaomi… a Chinese handset manufacturer, (6th in china based on sales revenue) is valued at 10 billion dollars. It is 3 years old and pre- IPO . Similarly Motorola was sold to Google for 12 billion couple of years back.
(*Source http://tinyurl.com/nvug4np)

But this is Nokia, the largest mobile phone manufacturer and that brand  that believed in connecting people,somewhere down the line the connection dropped and the call got disconnected.

What went wrong for Nokia?

connecting_people_27315

While there will case studies harassing students at business schools trying to answer the above question, I think I can summaries it in three key heading.

Missing the Big Picture: The telecommunication landscape was changing. It was not the voice that was connecting people it was Data. Facebook, Twitter, Whatsapp, Skype…. the list goes on. Nokia missed the picture and was trying to provide devices that offered superior audio quality.In the era of downloaded music and pirated cam prints, quality was never the highest priority. (Remember Apple antenna) It was being connected by data that was important. Apple recognized that and created a whole new business vertical to tap into that demand. Rest is history

iphone-app-cartoon

Ecosystems: In the new mobile landscape software ecosystem is the game changer. Apple recognized it and invested in technology and infrastructure to help terraform the new emerging landscape. It understood the disadvantage of being on the wrong side of the application space, it has faced it in its PC business. Apple replicated a model in mobile space what Windows did to it in the PC market. Develop the ecosystem and leverage both software and hardware side of the market.

Mobile ecosystem is a delicate balance between technology and  application space. When it comes down to offering users highly accessible and relevant content, IOS and Android wins hands down against Symbian. With Android and IOS, the critical availability of core applications that fulfill user needs is such that people will equate their phone usage with the operating system and what it gives, ignoring the subtle differences in the physical media and the software layer above it. Nokia found itself on the wrong side, unaware.

Nokia made a mistake to stick with its own unique operating system for its brand of devices, which might have become the limiting factor for its growth. It was unable to leverage the huge potential it had with when more than 80% of the phones in the market were on its platform.

Innovation Paralysis: For a company that had pioneered GSM technology, developed Symbian and all those early innovations 546070_10152060976620099_823600787_nthe company seem to be in a state of paralysis from the time IPhone was launched and android followed. With the released of IOS Symbian got outdated from day one. Even for someone with no tech background like me, Symbian looked drab, i was disenchanted with Nokia the moment I saw an IPhone.

I thought Nokia will bounce back with an even better OS but that never happened. They stuck on to Symbian. After the agony of dwindling sales and profits Nokia finally decided to dump the Symbian OS and create a new smartphone OS that would be distributed as an open-source. It was called  Maemo and ran on the Linux platform. It was a disaster.

Then Nokia wanted something entirely new, something hot and decided to stick with Intel’s Linux-based operating system – Moblin. Unfortunately, things didn’t go as planned, Mobiln was later merged with MeeGo which caused further delays and Ironically it go went gone with one device. In the meantime Samsung adopted Android and there were more than a billion app downloads from the iTunes store.

While IPhone changed the landscape with IPhone it was disappointing that Nokia in the last 10 years was unable to deliver not even a single revolutionary or game-changing feature. Finally it dumped its OS plan and decided to go with Microsoft as their primary OS, that marked the end of innovation in software thereby and a tech suicide for the company. It would have been better had it just adopted Android and continued to compete with Samsung with their innovations in hardware space

Endgame to all the above : Nokia handset division got bought over by Microsoft…

Buy what did Microsoft Buy?

MICROSOFT NOKIA DEAL

THE DEAL

I Wonder Why….

August 25, 2013 2 comments

vladimirputin-scratching-tbiWhy the sun lightens our hair, but darkens our skin?

Why women can’t put on mascara with their mouth closed?

Why toasters always have a setting so high that could burn the toast to a horrible crisp which no decent human being would eat?

Why there a light in the fridge and not in the freezer?

Why you don’t ever see the headline: “Psychic Wins Lottery”?

Why “abbreviated” is such a long word?

Why Doctors call what they do “practice”?

Why you have to click on “Start” to stop ‘Windows’?

Why lemon juice is made with artificial flavor, while dishwashing liquid is made with real lemons?

Why there isn’t mouse flavoured cat food?

Who tastes dog food when it has a “new & improved” flavor?

Why people point to their wrist when asking for the time, but don’t point to their bum when they ask where the bathroom is?

Why your Obstetrician or GynBush OCnfusedaecologist leaves the room when you get undressed – if they are going to look up there anyway?

Why Goofy stands erect while Pluto remains on all fours? They’re both dogs!

Why Noah didn’t swat those two mosquitoes?

Why they sterilize the needle for lethal injections?

Why sheep don’t shrink when it rains?

Why they are called apartments when they are all stuck together?

If con is the opposite of pro, is congress the opposite of progress?

Why they call the airport “a terminal” if flying is supposedly so safe?

Who the first first person was to look at a cow and say, “I think I’ll squeeze these pink dangly things here, and drink whatever comes out?”

Obama OCnfusedWho the first person was that said, “See that chicken there, I’m gonna eat the next thing that comes outta it’s bum?”

Why the professor on Gilligan’s Island can make a radio out of coconut, but can’t he fix a hole in a boat?

If people evolved from apes, why are there still apes?

What do you call male ballerinas?

If blind people can see their dreams? Do they dream??

That if Wile E. Coyote from the Road Runner had enough money to buy all that ACME crap, why didn’t he just buy dinner?

If quizzes are quizzical, what are tests?

If corn oil is made from corn, and vegetable oil is made from vegetables, then what is baby oil made from?

If electricity comes frojamesm electrons, does morality come from morons?

Why the “Alphabet Song” and “Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star” have the same tune?

Do illiterate people get the full effect of Alphabet Soup?

Why do they call it an asteroid when it’s outside the hemisphere, but call it a hemorrhoid when it’s on the outside of your ass?

Why it is when you blow in a dog’s face, he gets mad at you, but when you take him on a car ride, he sticks his head out the window?

How come we put a man on the moon before realising it would be a good idea to put wheels on suitcases?

Why brain cells come and brsarkozyain cells go, but fat cells are forever?

How important someone has to be before they can be ‘assassinated’ rather than just plain ‘murdered’?

How come “phonetically” is spelt with a “ph”?

Why a round pizza gets delivered in a square box?

Why people pay to go up in tall buildings, and then put money in binoculars to look at things on the ground?

When you get to heaven / paradise / nirvana, are you stuck wearing whatever you were buried or cremated in forever?

Why people say they “slept like a baby”, when babies normally wake up every two hours?

Why do we press harder on a remote control when we know the batteries are flat?

How do blind peoplechimp know when they are done wiping?

What would the speed of lightning be if it didn’t zigzag?

Why does someone believe you when you say there are four billion stars, but has to check when you say the paint is wet?

Why is it that our children can’t read a Bible in school, but they can in prison?

Why doesn’t glue stick to the bottle?

Why do they use sterilized needles for death by lethal injection?

Why doesn’t Tarzan have a beard?

Why does Superman stop bullets with his chest, but ducks when you throw a revolver at him?

It was just Another Night…(Short Story)

August 13, 2013 Leave a comment

balconyHazy charcoal silhouettes painted the view from my tiny balcony as I gazed deep into nothingness. It was just any other night; cold, dark and silent. It was way past bedtime; just about time the nocturnal bingers considered returning home. I have been standing here, struggling, for a long time. Days whizzed past like lights on a speeding metro; I could only gaze and watch them flow: hazy, opaque and in trammel. Nights were a burden that I could not avoid. I feel old, really old and this is going to be a long bitter night.

I miss the time when Vienna made me feel young. It was like those impish high-school days when hope and smile never seem leave an arms distance. Long barefoot walks in the Stadtpark, the lazy swirl of Riesenrad, those unceasing discussions on art and music at the café Demel near Hofburg place or just being lost in the silence of a moonlit Danube.

How can I not miss them?
How do I let it go, the feeling of being alive, the feeling of being in love? It made me feel young; she ensured I stayed that way all along.

The hot end of Marlboro made me jump as it traded my dream with the dark canvas of night, devoid of color and life. I fiddled my pockets for another one. Was it the fifth? The ashtray suggests it is ninth; I have to give up smoking; do I really need to… and I lit it.

It has been more than two years since I met Eva and I am drawn to her every time with the same passion as I felt the first time I saw her at the gallery. Like a painting etched in dull canvas she was a stark contrast to the white plastered walls of the gallery. My eyes could not savor enough of her tawny hair curled to unruly perfection. She was clad in blue denim and a white tee and was intensely gazing at one my wares on the wall. She was an artist, a student; embroidered in red was the symbol ] a [ resting unambiguously on her sleeve, a  logo of akademie der bildenden künste, a prestigious fine arts academy in Vienna,  and then she turned. Her dark brown eyes, sparking through the clear glasses caught me off guard; she smiled; I shivered.

The night was getting colder; I can feel the numbness of my fingers as I held on to the glass of scotch. I watched some teens singing in the street…, something in German which I could not pick. One of them looked at me standing like a ghost on the first floor balcony and lifted his hand in a friendly salute and I returned the gesture unconsciously. My hand twitched on the glass as I woke them from their icy stupor as I watched them waddle away into the night. Why do all good things come to an end..?

Eva was twenty four when I first met her and I was lugging myself into my forties and waltzing around Europe trying to sell my wares. I have a studio in Weiden in Vienna given to me by an old friend who would rent it to me for a canvas a year. He would not take money from me and I would not want to rent free, so that was our middle path. It was big enough for me to double up as a working studio and a cozy residence. I enjoyed its loneliness, its silence, but that was before she came into my life.

In the beginning we discussed art, she loved talking and I loved watching her talk. It was perfect. Later her conversations were more discursive and would wander all around. Impressionism, Fauvism, existentialism and then suddenly we would be talking of Bavarian beers. We were indefatigable in talking and days never seemed enough hours to finish a discussion. There was a certain pleasure in accepting defeat to her cogent reasoning. We would walk the first district watching tourists and their awed expressions or just go to the hills in the north for a quieter Sundays. We did nothing special in particular, but whatever we did together felt special. We were not defined by love, love defined us; it made life look simpler, easier and worth the effort to drag it through the chores of existence. A sense of good feeling prevailed. I wanted to grow with her, as Dag once said, firmer, simpler, quieter, warmer.

The silence of the night was eerie; it made my thoughts sound louder…as if coming out of an unruly megaphone. I walked in to my studio and dribbled to a mounted canvas; it stared at me blank, devoid of life. I want to draw to distract, to stop my head screaming to do something, I have no clue what but wait for the sun to raise and wash away the darkness. I started to wash the canvas with paint but the brush seems to have a mind of its own and why is it so heavy?

It was last summer when Eve moved into the studio. It was always too big for me, and way too lonely. She hardly changed anything in the studio, except a closet changing it ownership, but everything seemed different. Like a freshly painted canvas coming alive after the last swash of paint. The candles, were a nice touch, so was her presence. I needed no reason to smile other than watch her cuddle in my arms. Everything was suddenly warm even those cold Austrian winters and wines gave life a new meaning.

The colors were growing darker than I want them to be on the canvas, I was painting without a reason, without an outcome. The darkness was receding in the background and the warm light of the sun tried to wrap the distant skies. It is beautiful. But I hated it. It made me irritable, made me angry. I was helpless and it made me clinch deep inside.

We should have been married. It would have made her happy. I think so. She never mentioned it, we never talked about it. It was unnecessary. But it seems so right…today, when I see her draped in wires, trying to hold on to a life that would never be the same

She loved to cycle and spring made it ever more pleasant thing to do. Vienna was a cyclists dream. It was designed for the enthusiast. She made the morning breakfast and left a note that she will be back in time for the evening plans. I slept as she left the flat.

She never kept her promise and I have not slept ever since.

A call from the hospital went unanswered as I kept my phone on silent mode, lest it should disturb my precious tranquility. Late evening I answered the door to the call of an officer who came to tell that she met an accident and is at the hospital. I was disturbed by his imperturbable calmness of manner, but not worried; the cops told me she fell of her cycle… how bad can that be?

They did not mention that she hurt her head and will never recover from her induced coma and she never did. It’s been eight years since I read her note on the table, I see her every day with the hope that she will return home. An occasional twitch sends a spasm of hope but it passes away as spasms always do…ever so quickly.

I have to say my final good bye one morning, and let her sleep. Wires can only keep you alive but they do not bless you with life. All wires have to stop one day and tomorrow morning…is it today. They are going to stop those wires from fueling a life that has long gone away and another which will never be the same again. I wish this was an endless night.

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